Cheap Car Insurance to Get if You're a a College Student

Students can take advantage of great insurance discounts while in school, such as resident student, occasional driver, and good student discounts.
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Going away to college represents a big step in any young person’s life. If you plan on driving your car to university, you need to get insurance. Many insurance companies offer special discounts to students in an effort to keep their car insurance premiums lower.
The following sections talk about what college students need to keep in mind when deciding on the best insurance coverage for their needs.

When can a college student stay on their parent’s car insurance?

Many students stay on their parent’s policy through college. A student can stay on their parent’s plan as long as they meet the following requirements:
  • You don’t own the vehicle you drive
  • You still live in your parent’s home
  • You still list your parent’s address as your primary address, even if you are a full-time student

Things to consider when getting insurance for the first time

Even if you don’t take your vehicle with you to college and only drive it when you go home, you still need car insurance. In addition to protecting your vehicle if someone has an accident in it, your insurance also helps cover you if you have an accident in someone else’s car while at college. At the very least, you should stay on your parent’s policy, if possible. But if you own a vehicle, you must get your own insurance policy. Some factors to keep in mind when acquiring insurance when attending college include:
  • Out-of-state schools: If you plan on attending college in another state, make sure that you understand the coverage minimums of the state you plan on moving to. The following from ValuePenguin shows the liability coverage minimum requirements by state:
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<col style="width: 478.5px"> </colgroup> <tr> <th class="tg-lmol" colspan="2">Liability Coverage Requirements by State</th> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-amwm">State</td> <td class="tg-amwm">Body Injury Liability per Person / Bodily Injury Liability per Accident / Property Damage Coverage Requirements</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Alabama</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Alaska</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$50,000 / 100,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Arizona</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$15,000 / 30,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Arkansas</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">California</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Colorado</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 40,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Connecticut</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Delaware</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$15,000 / 30,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">District of Columbia</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Florida</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$10,000 / 20,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Georgia</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Hawaii</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Idaho</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 15,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Illinois</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$20,000 / 40,000 / 15,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Indiana</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Iowa</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$20,000 / 40,000 / 15,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Kansas</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Kentucky</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Louisiana</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$15,000 / 30,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Maine</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$15,000 / 30,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Maryland</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$30,000 / 60,000 / 15,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Massachusetts</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$30,000 / 60,000 / 15,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Michigan</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Minnesota</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Mississippi</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Missouri</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Montana</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Nebraska</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Nevada</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">New Hampshire</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">New Jersey</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">New Mexico</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">New York</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">North Carolina</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$30,000 / 60,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">North Dakota</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Ohio</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$12,500 / 25,000 / 7,500</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Oklahoma</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Oregon</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 20,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Pennsylvania</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Rhode Island</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">South Carolina</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">South Dakota</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Tennessee</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 15,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Texas</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$30,000 / 60,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Utah</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 65,000 / 15,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Vermont</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Virginia</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 20,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Washington</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">West Virginia</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Wisconsin</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="tg-baqh">Wyoming</td> <td class="tg-baqh">$25,000 / 50,000 / 20,000</td> </tr> </table> Souce: ValuePenguin
  • Resident student discounts: Some colleges offer college students discounts if they find themselves attending college 100 or more miles away from their parent’s home. This discount only remains in effect if you don’t drive your vehicle, such as when you leave it at your parent’s house while away.
  • Occasional driver discounts: If you leave your car at your parent’s house while away at school, there is a good chance that you also qualify for a low-mileage discount. Make sure to ask your agent about low-mileage discounts and if they apply to your policy.
  • Good student discounts: Getting good grades in college can also result in lower car insurance premiums. Many high school students use this discount to help keep their premiums down, and sometimes this discount can extend into college. Make sure to ask your insurance agent if you can still get a good student discount while in college.
Acquiring car insurance upon entering college does not always equate to high premiums. Paying attention to what discounts a company offers can help reduce your rates and make your insurance premiums more affordable.

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