How to Fill Out and File an SR-22

Filling out and filing an SR-22 form helps drivers who have had a DUI, points, or driven while uninsured regain their license or apply for a new one.
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Having a DUI, getting caught driving without insurance, or causing a serious-injury car accident does not mean the end of your days as a licensed driver. While these actions represent serious issues, you do have one option at your disposal when trying to re-apply or get your license reinstated — it’s called an SR-22.
This article walks you through what exactly an SR-22 is, how you get it, and how you fill it out and file it.

Part 1 of 3: The purpose of an SR-22

An SR-22 certifies that you meet your state’s car insurance requirements. Drivers convicted of DUIs, drivers who have a lot of points on their driving record, or people who drive while uninsured must file an SR-22 before qualifying to re-apply for a license or get a suspended license reinstated.
When working to regain the use of a license, the state DMV informs drivers if they need to file an SR-22.

Part 2 of 3: How to fill out an SR-22

Your car insurance company can help you fill out an SR-22 or do it for you. You can find a generic SR-22 form here. You need to provide the following information:
  • Your full name
  • Your mailing address
  • Policy number
  • Case number
  • Driver’s license number
  • Birth date
  • Social Security Number (SSN)
  • The vehicle make, model, year, and Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)
  • The state you are filing in
  • Name of the car insurance company
  • The car insurance company’s NAIC number
If you are using the same car insurance company you had before the incident that caused you to get the SR-22, they probably already have all of this information. So check with the company to see if they can file the SR-22 for you. Also, before filing an SR-22, you must make sure you have the minimum amount of car insurance as required by your state.
Most states require you to carry the minimum liability coverage as shown in this chart from ValuePenguin.
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Coverage Requirements By State
State Body Injury Liability Per Person / Bodily Injury Liability Per Accident / Property Damage Coverage Requirements
Alabama $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Alaska $50,000 / 100,000 / 25,000
Arizona $15,000 / 30,000 / 10,000
Arkansas $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
California $15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000
Colorado $25,000 / 40,000 / 10,000
Connecticut $20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000
Delaware $15,000 / 30,000 / 10,000
District of Columbia $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Florida $10,000 / 20,000 / 10,000
Georgia $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Hawaii $20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000
Idaho $25,000 / 50,000 / 15,000
Illinois $20,000 / 40,000 / 15,000
Indiana $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Iowa $20,000 / 40,000 / 15,000
Kansas $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Kentucky $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Louisiana $15,000 / 30,000 / 25,000
Maine $15,000 / 30,000 / 10,000
Maryland $30,000 / 60,000 / 15,000
Massachusetts $30,000 / 60,000 / 15,000
Michigan $20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000
Minnesota $20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000
Mississippi $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Missouri $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Montana $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Nebraska $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Nevada $15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000
New Hampshire $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
New Jersey $15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000
New Mexico $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
New York $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
North Carolina $30,000 / 60,000 / 25,000
North Dakota $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Ohio $12,500 / 25,000 / 7,500
Oklahoma $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Oregon $25,000 / 50,000 / 20,000
Pennsylvania $15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000
Rhode Island $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
South Carolina $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
South Dakota $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Tennessee $25,000 / 50,000 / 15,000
Texas $30,000 / 60,000 / 25,000
Utah $25,000 / 65,000 / 15,000
Vermont $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Virginia $25,000 / 50,000 / 20,000
Washington $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
West Virginia $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Wisconsin $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Wyoming $25,000 / 50,000 / 20,000
Some states do not require you to file an SR-22 when you have a qualifying incident, such as a DUI. Keep in mind that if you move to a different state with different minimum insurance amounts, or no SR-22 at all, you must still follow the old SR-22 until it runs out. Most states in the U.S. require you to file an SR-22, except for the following:
  • Delaware
  • Kentucky
  • Minnesota
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • Oklahoma
  • Pennsylvania

Part 3 of 3: How to file an SR-22

To obtain an SR-22, you need to first call your car insurance company and inform them you need an SR-22. The insurance company more than likely will ask why you need an SR-22. Your insurance company then mails both you and the department of state in your area a completed SR-22 form, unless you fill out the form yourself.
Obtaining an SR-22 will most likely make your car insurance premiums go up due to your inclusion in a high-risk group of drivers. You car insurance company might even drop your policy if the company does not insure high-risk drivers. This means you need to find insurance with a company that does.
While the costs to file an SR-22 vary by state, expect on average to spend at least $25. In addition, many insurance companies require SR-22 holders to pay for the whole term of the insurance policy, either six months or one year, upon issuing it. Once you acquire an SR-22, expect to have it at least for three years before you don’t need it anymore.
Even if you have a DUI, are caught driving without insurance, or have a serious-injury accident, you can still qualify for insurance coverage by using an SR-22 form. While this often results in higher car insurance premiums, an SR-22 allows you to regain your license or apply for a new one and continue on with your life.
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